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What can doctors do to help low-income patients who need them?

It’s a harsh fact in the U.S. that people who live in poor rural or urban communities are more likely to have health problems and experience limited access to health care. Hospital closures have increased throughout the country, and the communities with the greatest shortage of doctors also tend to be the areas with the highest poverty. Patients there struggle to afford and access health care, while doctors face challenges related to reimbursement and patient communication. But there is hope. Read on to find out the best practices and tools that benefit not only low-income patients, but all patients, as well as the doctors who serve them. Read More

In 2019, we have access to two exciting new therapies

This past year brought some significant advances in eye care as far as new tests, technology, and drug approvals, and 2019 is looking just as promising. In 2018, we gained access to the first two new glaucoma drugs in decades. Now two more new drugs will soon be available to us. These include a new ocular corticosteroid that uses a revolutionary drug delivery technology, and a new drug that treats a rare and progressive eye disease that can lead to corneal scarring and vision loss. Here’s why I’m looking forward to trying these new therapies in my practice.Read More

New technology is on the horizon that can help you streamline your practice

New technologies are emerging that will transform ophthalmology and optometry. They may not be the ones that are on your radar, however. “While the eye care world has been fixated on telemedicine and online eye exams, robots are set to impact our 21st century world,” wrote Thomas A. Wong, O.D. in the Optometry Times.Read More

The program that promised to reduce doctors’ student debt is falling short

The median cost of attending a four-year public medical school is more than $240,000. Private medical school fees can exceed $340,000, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). Most medical students rely heavily on financial aid to fund their education. The median education debt for new med school grads is $180,000, with 14 percent of graduates starting their residency owing $300,000 or more.Read More

How Rendia is empowering patients who have irreversible vision loss

This is the second half of a two-part series in honor of Meet the Blind Month.

Months ago, a few members of the Rendia team met with the National Federation of the Blind to learn how we could support one another. During our meeting, we learned how many patients first learn they’re going blind, and how the message is frequently one of hopelessness and tragedy. This message was in stark contrast to what we witnessed at the NFB: blind employees leading meetings, non-sighted coworkers making weekend plans together, hallway walls decorated with photos of blind people enjoying activities such as horseback riding and fishing.Read More

An Open Letter to Eye Doctors

As an eye care provider, the time and dedication you bring to your occupation of preserving individuals’ sight is a medical necessity and a credit to your profession. There may, however, be a time in your career, when your best efforts fail and one of your patients loses their sight.  At this critical moment, you can render your patient a great service. Your patient’s immediate reaction to the news of blindness will be influenced by your attitude toward blindness, and the information you provide. The National Federation of the Blind wishes to assist you in this area of your professional life.  We hope that the information provided below will help you to develop or enhance a comfortable, positive, and effective approach to blindness in your patients.

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